Seasonal recipes

The importance of using seasonal recipes that take advantage of produce that is in season is endless, not only for the environment but for our bodies too. We live in a world where it is normal to have blueberries and pineapple in the winter. As much as I love that world, it’s not always the best for us. While it is difficult to step out of that way of living it is important to acknowledge that with the season changes, comes produce changes as well.  Eating seasonally provides us with foods at their peak nutritional level as well as encourages eating locally grown food. This results in less travel to your plate and as a by-product, less of a carbon foot print. Have you ever noticed how blueberries don’t taste as good in December as they did in July? There’s a reason for that! Seasonal eating also helps us connect with nature, by eating what the earth provides during that period of time our bodies become more in sync with the earth. Right now we are transitioning from fall into winter: romaine lettuce officially cannot survive in this temperature, so let’s see what can with these yummy, warming seasonal recipes!

Chia oat pancakes
1 cup of dry blended oats
1 defrosted banana
2 tbsp. of chia seeds
2 eggs (you can substitute this by adding more banana and chia)
½ cup of coconut milk
1 pinch of sea salt/ Himalayan salt
Use your hands or a fork to mash these ingredients together. Form into desired pancake shape. Fry in 1 tbsp. of coconut oil until both sides are golden. Serve with sunflower butter smeared on top and add slices of a local crisp apple.
This breakfast is FULL of healthy fats and vitamin E to help reduce inflammation and keep your metabolism in check. The fibre content will keep you going for hours, and the oats will keep help keep your nervous system soothed.

Root vegetable and sprout salad
½ cup of sprouts (mung bean, lentils, chickpeas, adzuki….or your favourite combination)
1 cup of shredded carrots
1 cup of shredded beets
1 handful of walnuts
4 dried prunes torn into little bits
1 tablespoon of olive oil
1 squirt of braggs
Lemon juice to your desire
Combine all ingredients in a bowl and enjoy!

Not only is sprouting something you can do all year round, it’s so easy it’s ridiculous! All you have to do is soak the bean combination for 8 hours. After soaking them make sure to rinse them and place them in a colander, put the colander on top a bowl (so that the water can drain) and rinse the sprouts 2-3 times a day. Most sprouts should be ready in only 3 days!

Curry carrot soup
1 potato
5-6 large carrots
1 can of coconut milk
1 cup of broth
1 tbsp. of balsamic vinegar or apple cider vinegar
1 tbsp. of your favourite curry
6 dried apricots torn in little bits
Boil veggies in the cup of broth (you may need to add a little bit more if needed), once soft you may add the rest of the ingredients. Simmer and use a hand blender to blend soup into a thick pot of joy! ( you can also add 1 cup of cooked red lentils for extra protein)
You may also garnish with a handful of cilantro!

If you would like to learn more about seasonal eating, this website does a great job of keeping you informed of what’s in and what’s not…. http://www.getlocalbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/SW-BC-Seasonal-Chart-2012.pdf

This entry was posted in Children, Healthy Recipes, Men's health, Nutrition, Personal health, Women's health and tagged , , , , , , , , by Aleks. Bookmark the permalink.
Follow Aleksandra Kushnir on Quora

About Aleks

After being raised on my traditional ancestral whole foods diet; I adopted a western diet and consequently adopted digestive issues. After learning about this amazing connection; I was opened up to the incredible world of healing plants. In order to heal my own body I experimented with every imaginable diet out there; omnivore, vegan, raw, paleo, macrobiotic, you name it, I've probably tried it. Unfortunately none of these diets worked, the only thing that worked was intuitively listening to my body and taking in what works right for me. I had always been a passionate foodie, but it wasn't until graduating for the Institute of Holistic Nutrition that I could efficiently integrate my love for food with my passion for healing. I am a Certified Holistic Nutritionist, and my own journey of self healing has encouraged me to help others find their own path to wellness. I believe that we are each unique on a bio-chemical level and require an individualistic diet for each of our needs. Our bodies are constantly speaking to us, and my job is to help you listen; and find that mind-body connection that brings us a wealth of wellness.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>